Kfizabelh Gourley

These irises look so real youll \v.vtt to put them in a vase. This quick-and-easy project is quite a conversation piece.

I he finished pillow measua-s 15V?" i jr.

Ribbons of Spring Iris Needlepoint Pillow

15* x 20* piece of 18-count needlepoint canvas Perk? col Ion purple Perle cotton M, gi-een Pcrlc cotton #8. yellow Perle cot Ion #8. white Small bag of polyester stuffing yd dark purple 100% cotton fabric

71 grams iridescent white seed beads, size 8' 14 grams rainbow iris seed Ihn«Is sizeö*

14 grams matte lavender seed beads, size 8*

14 grams iridescent transparent lavender seed beads, size 8' 14 grams lined gold seed beads, si/e 8"'

14 grams opaque ochre yellow seed beads, size 8'" 14 grams matte translucent light green seed beads, si/e 8" 14 grams transparent dark green seed beads, size 14 grams iridescent opaque light green seed beads, si/e if Sewing needle small enough to ImI through bead but with an eye big enough lor perlc cotlon Sewing and embroidery scissors

I worked on Uie I lowers and ribbons first so that I could mindlessly fill in the white background, which uses the most beads. Using the green «>:-ton thread, start tieedlepoinling on the bottom stems. Make a basic sewing knot on the end of the thread I'NLT a bole of the needlepoint can vas towards the middle of the bottom of the canvas Siring a dark green bead. PNDT the second hole directly above hole you came out of See Fig. 1. PNUI u hole that is Iwo away from the hole you first PNUT String a dark green bead. PNDT the second hole directly above the one you ju^t came out of. Use design c hart for bead color placement.

Continue needlepointing entire piece, changing thread to match

figure I

■ Rainbow Iri$ 2 Matte Iwcndcr

■ Iridescent tranipawc lawender

□ IridCKCfl VitllCC

■ Transparent green

■ Transluent lighc peen

■ Cbxjue liffK jrreen

Design Chart figure I

Design Chart

■ Rainbow Iri$ 2 Matte Iwcndcr

■ Iridescent tranipawc lawender

□ IridCKCfl VitllCC

■ Transparent green

■ Transluent lighc peen

■ Cbxjue liffK jrreen bead coior. Make sure you skip every other hole so that the beads are not crowded together. See Fig. 2. Lath bead has a nine hole space

When you are finished needle-pointing. cut away the needlepoint canvas Iron) around beads, leaving a V " canvas edge all the way around. Now block the piece.

From the purple fabric, cut two 11" x 14* squares for the body of the pillow. For Hie rullle. cut 4" wide strips Sew 4" strips together to make one 100"-long strip.

In the exact middle of one of the fabric squares, pin on ihe lieaded needlepoint canvas. Tuck under excess canvas and, using the blind stitch, sew by hand all the way around the leaded canvas. Make sure the needlepoint canvas is lucked tip under the piece far enough so that none shows

Fold in half lengthwise the 4" strips (wrung sides together! to ere ate 2" strips Iron fiat. Gather Ihe sH vage edges. Pin on the right side of one of the fabric squares all aiong the edge. See Fig. 3. Place the right sides of both squares together, making sure the gathered strips stay between lx>th squares Pin. Sew along edge, leaving a '/i" seam allowance. I*ave a 4" hole for turning the pillow inside out and StlilTing. After it is turned inside oul and stuffed, sew up the 4" hole using the blind stitch.

M .I lU.I .I'OINI • KIUIJONS Oh SPRING: IRIS NKhDLKIXJI.N r PILLOW ■ 121 ■

Inspirational Gallery

A-tiquc ncoc<l Native Ametnan ppwderho« From dw colecuon a'OenTaboa

Antique purse. Tjmbour swell 0« hUK.From tfie cofcxion of Suzanne hijrfWd

ArtKfj* beaded purse wici ccijlod cliip Do«* «1 Ok tambour »uh From the coicr.ion of Cotmic Lcoiner.

Ancque needepw-t pirse with ¡Uii and metal iced beads Front die coSet'.on 01 Cam* Loomer

Ar*c.« embrodcrtd tuffs Site 18 seed beais on vtfvet From co tec con o< EBenTaJbott

Ti*r»ol-the<*-tiiry Norwfj»« cosfum FrwcwlerH ln^U beads and seed beads on woo' From the cot «coon c4 Ma^t

ANTIQUE BEADWORK

Ancquc puw Three«* mcul iocC txah embro«Je«ed on fabric. Aroque bix2«i pur« done I- the a->bour «uh From tlic toflectio" of EUcn TjJbcxt

Netted hartal from 1919, from th* coBtcbor of EfcnfcfcotL

In from France (1918). Tambour «itth or leather F-or> the coteac of Mr. and Mr». Joe Hcma-der

Antique cUip purw SA feet po** i-jcrt with cooched, beaded bjc«£rojr*J From tltc coKcction cf Conn'-c Loooer

Netted hartal from 1919, from th* coBtcbor of EfcnfcfcotL

In from France (1918). Tambour «itth or leather F-or> the coteac of Mr. and Mr». Joe Hcma-der

INSPIRATIONAL GAI.I.KRY

ethnic beadwork

Netred met t< ttonrobtque
Nette« coto' Ven» ftrátt

ííctred 7i*j wf tetter /uhi gri* b«d emelecars' tc kwI » t'ftf lovfi. Evtrjr b«d color or ccmb-£00n oí co-orï hokh a di*em* ineïnçe

Netted African hrrtleu lor carry rç baikMí and arv

Antique netted O r#i« awei fror» dv (0*e<t«on oI E>r Titooa

HwcNjI jourd from Mexico Uned w«h tww to anchor the bcxh

CoucKed b»by «o«adni Had« by the BUcWoot Irwiur.s of Montana

Zww <«tai t>Mrf*d 6j..r<i Do*« n tubiitr pc/vrtc ttittf -«ned ipa>-i

Afrtcan bwxJed tin cup. Done in a retting jtrtch

African bc»3c<l do Vanon be»3 technic«« mcudtfij rctunj. pcycte. kurtgbone. And wxJni str»>X» of bead» round acooe

Aim»" beaded krTifoy doll Vjr-ous bead t«br«quei .ted ndu4 rj courhfog, necr*^. ar.d wmiTg ump ©I *C»JV a con

Zuni kwfcirt beaded figur« o' harj*» Done in the tubula' peyote with

HwcNjI jourd from Mexico Uned w«h tww to anchor the bcxh

CoucKed b»by «o«adni Had« by the BUcWoot Irwiur.s of Montana

Afrtcan bwxJed tin cup. Done in a retting jtrtch

Zww <«tai t>Mrf*d 6j..r<i Do*« n tubiitr pc/vrtc ttittf -«ned ipa>-i

African bc»3c<l do Vanon be»3 technic«« mcudtfij rctunj. pcycte. kurtgbone. And wxJni str»>X» of bead» round acooe

Aim»" beaded krTifoy doll Vjr-ous bead t«br«quei .ted ndu4 rj courhfog, necr*^. ar.d wmiTg ump ©I *C»JV a con

Zuni kwfcirt beaded figur« o' harj*» Done in the tubula' peyote with

Zunt Intoi scaded Iffta" StO^eDer" Done tubulir pcyote uicch wth •>e*.ted ikm

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Antique Collecting

Antique Collecting

ABOUT fifty years ago, when the subject of English furniture first began to be studied and to be written about, it was divided conveniently into four distinct types. One writer called his books on the subject The Age of Oak, The Age of Walnut, The Age of Mahogany and The Age of Satinwood. It is not really quite as simple as that, for each of the so-called Ages overlaps the others and it is quite impossible to lagt down strict dates as to when any one timber was introduced or when it finally, if ever, went out of favour.

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