Herringbone Stitch

The herringbone stitch, which originated in Africa gives the finished project a beautiful woven or knitted look. There are two methods of beginning the herringbone stitch. Here is the one we used in this book. After mastering the first lew rows, it is an easy stitch to do. This stitch is best used for flat pieces. You must have at least four beads per row. or a number divisible by four, because the herringbone stitch is done in groups of two with single beads on each end. For this example, we will use twelve-bead rows. Always keep the thread tension light, except in Row 1. where you can adjust the stitches evenly.

ROW 1 String twelve beads. String one more bead PNT the ¿12 bead. Skip the next two beads (#11 and #10). PNT the next bead. #9. String two beads PNT next bead. Skip the next two beads (#7 and PNT the next bead. *5 String two beads. PNT the next l>eacL »4 Skip the next two beads l»3 and *2> PNT the last bead.

ROW 2: String two beads. PNBT first bead strung. See Photo 13. Skip next bead. See Fig. ' String two beads. PNT next bead 'Skip one bead. PNT next bead. See Fig. 2. String two beads. PNT next bead.* Repeat between asterisks until end of row. Every other two-bead set will be hanging down. Since these were the two beads skipped in the first row. they must be pushed up above the thread so that they are ready for the needle to pass through them. This only happens on Row 2.

ROW 3: String two beads. PNBT first bead strung 'PNT the first bead of the next two-bead set. See Photo 14.

Bnck stitch with sire 11 ' se«d beads

Brick Stitch With Dei-ca b«ds

Photo 9

Photo I0

Photo II

Photo 12

Photo 15

Photo 16

Herringbon« sotch with DcJica beads

Photo 13

Photo M

Herringbone stitch with size I0P Mid b«adj

Photo 17

Photo 18

Photo 15

String two beads. PNT the last bead of the two-bead set. See Photo 15.' Repeat between asterisks until end of row.

As you have probably noticed by now. the beads of each row are not in a straight line. Each group ol two makes an inverted U-shape. When pulling your stitches tight, especially with matte Japanese tubular beads, make sure one bead is on one side of the "IT and one is on the other. See Photo 16.

EXDJNG ROW

There are two different ending rows used in the projects in this book. One makes the edge even. The other makes the edge look the same as the beginning edge—singular beads topping each group of two beads.

Even fcdge: Siring one bead. PNT next two beads of two-bead set. •String one bead. PNT next two beads of two-bead set.' Repeat between asterisks until end of row.

Photo 16

To make both ends look the same, turn piece over and do the same thing to the beginning edge.

Singular Read lopping: String two beads. PNT first bead of previous row. String one bead. 'PNT next two beads. String one bead/ Repeat between asterisks until end of row

Antique Collecting

Antique Collecting

ABOUT fifty years ago, when the subject of English furniture first began to be studied and to be written about, it was divided conveniently into four distinct types. One writer called his books on the subject The Age of Oak, The Age of Walnut, The Age of Mahogany and The Age of Satinwood. It is not really quite as simple as that, for each of the so-called Ages overlaps the others and it is quite impossible to lagt down strict dates as to when any one timber was introduced or when it finally, if ever, went out of favour.

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