Decreasing

At die end of a project, you may wish to nuke the tube taper down to a smaller diameter. This is attractive when attaching a clasp, and will make your work look more graceful.

I. Pass through two brads without adding a bead, as in Figure D-l.

I. Pass through two brads without adding a bead, as in Figure D-l.

figure D-l figure D-l

2. Pull the thread tight.

3. In the next row, add only one bead (a larger bead, if possible) in the spot where die two litads arc looted, as shown.

Figure D-2

I fiixJ ¡1 «ii.ier lo Hart our stitching iho plcce ot the diem« that mos» ol the beadwork will be stitched and thon oddM rne increases or decreases afterword* on Ihe ends. This i «specially helpful if your proicct is primarily a tub« ond don't plan for It to Increase and cocroase other thon on ends.

Brick Stitch

Another popular stirch used in creating off-loom beaded

, the finished brick stitch does look very similar to pcyote j, but the construction techniques are completely different.

As with peyote sritch, the brick stitch is easier to learn using the cylinder shapes of the Japanese seed beads than rounded seed beads, as the beads will nestle together and interlock.

e,iiuse you do not need a tension bead in this stitch, begin

[ cutting a length of stringing material, threading a needle and lmoning the thread.

. Pass through two bead», leaving a 6" rail, and then pass i bodi beads again, stitching in the ume direction. Use 1 fingers to position the beads so they are side by side and I them so the dircad is coming down through the second

7. Notice that there are threads connecting the beads across the top and the bottom of the base row. "Ihese threads will be stitched under when attaching the additional rows.

8. Add two beads at the start of each new row. Adding two beads allows you to create beadwork where there is no thread showing on the ends, so your beadwork will look more attractive and professional.

I a bead and pass ;h the second bead i the top down, as m in Figure B-l.

figure B-l

Id a bead and pass through the third bead from the bottom

I a bead and pass ;h the second bead i the top down, as m in Figure B-l.

L Continue adding s, repeating steps 3 14 as in Figure B-2, :il the base row is the cd length.
Figure £-2

. Once the base row catcd, stitch back ugh the row, :n a .ig (up and down) iner until you are ; to the beginning [the row. This ngrhens the base row i will make it more ile to handle.

Figure B-3

9. Referring to Figure B-4, pass the needle under the threads between the second and third bead from back to front (the needle slides under the threads to anchor the beads). Pull the thread tight and then pass dirough the second bead you just added on the second row from the bottom to the top.

Figure H-4

10. Add another bead, pass the needle under the threads between the third and fourth bead from back to front, pull the thread tight, and pass through the new bead front the bottom up, as shown in Figure B-5. Continue adding beads in this manner until you rcach the end of the row.

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Figure B-5

11. Flip the beadwork piece around horizontally and work the next row from left to right, starting by adding two beads for the next row.

Figure B-3

Using fringe wirh a loop highlights a small bead, which can add sparkle or a new clement.

1. Slide several beads onto the thread.

3. Pull rhe bead thread snugly to create a loop out of the three beads.

1. Slide several beads onto the thread.

2. Add three small beads, followed by a metal charm, and then three more small beads.

3. Pass back up through the beads that were first added.

4. Pull the bead thread so the beads arc snug but not tight.

Sevimt/fugt variation* arr fhoM-n .it left.

Putting o ho:« hitch ot the base of eoch fringe to anchor tn« fringe >s a OoixJ habit to get into, because H the fhreod break», only the beads on thot particular fringe wile come off. If you don't put c knot or c hialf-hitch between eoch fringe, you mov loose oil of Ihc beads on all of the fringes. To make a half-hilch. wrap the fhrrad around the base, but do not pull It tight, leaving a loop. Then, pass through the loop with the needle ond pull the loop tight to anchor the throod.

Basic Fringe

Basic fringe adds movement, texture, and dimension to your beadwork. This type of fringe is the most simple to create.

1. Begin by adding several beads onro the thread. Put a small bead on the end and pass back through rhe beads that were just added. Hie end bead is called a "pivot" bead, because you use this bead as a pivot point to stitch back up the fringe.

2. Pull the thread so the beads are snug, but not too tight, and standing at attention. The little bit of slack will allow the beads to lie naturally. It may cake a litde practice to get the feel. If the beads are too tight, you can insert die rip of your needle into the loop of the thread at the pivot bead and wiggle the thread looser.

Putting o ho:« hitch ot the base of eoch fringe to anchor tn« fringe >s a OoixJ habit to get into, because H the fhreod break», only the beads on thot particular fringe wile come off. If you don't put c knot or c hialf-hitch between eoch fringe, you mov loose oil of Ihc beads on all of the fringes. To make a half-hilch. wrap the fhrrad around the base, but do not pull It tight, leaving a loop. Then, pass through the loop with the needle ond pull the loop tight to anchor the throod.

Fringe Variations

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