Stringing

The color gradation in this necklace — from cool and dark in back to hot and bright in front — evokes a volcanic eruption.

Easy techniques erupt in a show-stopping necklace designed by Ronnie Lambrou

Stringing Magazine ImagesJewelry Stringing

I made Santorini Eruption as an homage to the volcanic-explosion that created rhe beautiful Santorini archipelago in the Aegean Sea some .3,500 years ago. Jeri Warhaftig's smoky-beads with streams of flame orange running through them were the starting point, and 1 carefully arranged rhe fringe beads to transition from dark and earthy at the back to fiery at the front. The fringe also transitions from short to long, enhancing the image of flowing lava.

stepoystep

Preparation

[1] Lay out rhe art-glass and 15 mm beads on your work surface, and position the fringe beads between them so that the colors gradate from one color at the back (such as the dark murky greens of the sea bed) to another color at the front (like the bright shimmering blues seen at the surface of the water) (photo a).

[2] Cut a piece of .014 heading wire five to six times longer than the middle art-glass bead. Repeat to cut a total of 68 pieces to the same length.

[3] Cut four more pieces of beading wire about eight times longer than the middle art-glass bead.

[4] Gather 12 picccs of beading wire for rhe middle bead (eight short and the four long ones cut in step 3), and make a bundle by wrapping the ends with small pieces of painter's tape (photo b). [5] Repeat step 4 to make a bundle of eight wires (all short) for the next three art-glass beads on each side of the necklace, and a bundle of six wires for the last art-glass bead on each side.

Assembly

[1] On a 24-in. (61 cm) piece of .019 beading wire, center the middle art-glass bead.

[2] On one end, string a disk bead, a 15 mm bead, a disk, and the next art-glass bead (photo c). Repeat to string the remaining art-glass, 15 mm, and disk beads on the first side of the necklace, then string the other side of the necklace as a mirror image of rhe first side.

[3] String the bundle of beading wires from step 4 of "Preparation" through the middle art-glass bead (photo d).

Repeat with the remaining art-glass beads and wire bundles.

[4] Test the necklace for fit, and string a few 6" seed beads on each end if needed. On one end, string a crimp bead and half of the clasp. Co back through rhe crimp bead and a few more beads. Crimp the crimp bead (Basics, p. 87), and trim the excess wire. Repeat on rhe other end.

[5] Isolate one wire in the middle bead bundle, and remove both ends from rhe tape. String seed beads and assorted fringe l>cads as desired on one end, then string a crimp bead and a seed bead. Skip the last seed bead, and go back through the crimp bead (photo e). Crimp the crimp bead, and trim the wire. Repeat with the same bead sequence on the other end of rhe wire.

[6] Repeat step 5 with all the remaining wires, varying the length of the fringes as desired, o

Strategically placed crystals add sparks of "fire" to the front of the necklace.

Jewelry Stringing

Jewelry designer

Bead artist materials necklaco 20 in. (51 cm)

• 20 12 mm copper disk beads (Oriental Treasures. 615-364-1218. look4beads.com)

• 450-500 assorted fringe beads n a variety of si tapes and sizes such as: 8x7 mm drop beads (driSed longthwise)

8x6 mm glass bicone beads 8 mm round crystals 7x6 mm cathedral beads 6 mm bicone crystals 6x4 mm drop beads 6x4 mm glass flower beads 6 x 3 mm glass roixlelles 6 mm cube beads 5 x 10 mm drop beads 4 mm pinch beads 4 mm dn»k beads 4 mm !)!cone crystals 3 mm Ifce-poftshed beads

• 20-30 g total 6°. 8". and 11° seed beads m a variety of colors and frtshes

• flexible beading wire

.014 (approx. 60-65 It ./18.3-19.8 m) .019 (24 ln./6l cm)

• crimping pliers

Ronnie Lambrou's early discovery of a box of oil paints and brushes in her parents' basement awakened her interest in art. She has studied many media, including painting, pottery, woodworking, interior design, polymer clay, and lampivorkmg. Ronnie is a self-taught jewelry designer, and her non-traditional use of materials has produced exuberant sculptural neck/aces with painterly expressions of color. Her work has been displayed in a number of galleries, publications, and competitions, as well as a 2008 exhibit called "Tribal Roots in the Garden State" at the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, N.J., in the U.S. E-mail Ronnie at rooroo(&sienna.net.

Strategically placed crystals add sparks of "fire" to the front of the necklace.

EDITOR'S NOTE:

If you're using smaller art-glass beads than Ronnie used, you may need more than nine to make a necklace. Or, make a bracelet instead: Cut the beading wire for the fringe three or four times the length of the art-glass beads, and make the fringe 1-1V5 in. (2.5-3.8 cm) long. - Julia

Jeri Warhaftig is a lifelong resident of West Orange, New Jersey, in the U.S. While practicing law full time, Jeri has devoted her artistic life to handcrafts, including sewing, porcelain, quilting, and beading. Since 1995, Jeri has set aside most other artistic pursuits in favor of a sharp focus on lamp working as it pertains to creating glass beads.

A member of the International Society of Glass Head makers (ISGB).Jeri has served on their Education Committee and now spends a lot of time teaching lampworkmg and writing for bead publications. Jeri's most recent accomplishment is the hardcover book Glass bead Workshop.

An assortment of Jeri's beads can be found at major bead shows and on her Web site, jeribeads.com. Her beads and tutorials have appeared in several publications, including The Flow. Lapidary Journal, and Glass Patterns Quarterly.

Jen has participated in several juried shows sponsored by the ISGH; in the New Jersey• Arts Annual: Crafts: and in the 2007 collaborative show co-sponsored by the ISGB and The American Association of Woodturners. She seeks to push the boundaries of glass beads through the use of metal inclusions and surface treatments such as enamels. Many of Jeri's beads are sandblasted or faceted in evolving collaborative projects with her husband, Neil Fabricant ("Dr. Fab").

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