Wire cutter

Inspired by the focal vessel made by Minneapolis lampworker Annemarie Herrlich, this free-form necklace evolved on its own. When making yours, do away with preplanning and let the beads speak to you.

Sylvia Sur has been beading since 1994 when she discovered The New Beadwork by Moss and Scherer. She lives in Los Angeles with husband Ed Kenney. Contact Sylvia through http://home.att.net/~ssur/ or http://home.att.net/~beadannex/.

Figure 2

PEYSTE SIDE

Step 1: Begin by working a two-bead wide peyote strap (Figure 1). Work the strap long enough to fit around the vessel handle and sew it into a circle.

pendant Step?; Use the head pin to string the Swarovski drop. Measure !/>" from the top of the drop and cut the pin with a wire cutters. Make a loop. Open and place an eye pin in the loop and close the eye pin.

String a size 8° bead, the amethyst bead, and a size 8° bead on the eye pin. Measure V" and cut the eye pin. Make a loop. Attach a jump ring to the bottom of the focal ornament. Attach the pendant to the focal ornament.

Figure 2

PEYSTE SIDE

Step 1: Begin by working a two-bead wide peyote strap (Figure 1). Work the strap long enough to fit around the vessel handle and sew it into a circle.

Step 2: Begin to increase your stitches and start the free-form work. Anything is fair game when you're working free-form. You can make increases by adding extra beads mid-fabric (Figure 2) or you can gently change the shape and feeling of your fabric by changing the shape and size of beads used.

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Figure 3

Figure 3

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Figure 4

StfP68

One component in free-form beadwork is the incorporation of larger beads. Here are two ways to do it.

For a horizontal hole, string a few beads off your peyote-stitched row. String the larger bead and a few beads. Pass back through the work to the beads strung right before the larger bead (Figure 3). Begin to work peyote off these beads. When you reach the larger bead, string enough beads to pass over the top of the larger bead. Work peyote on the beads strung on the other side of the larger bead. Continue working peyote back and forth above the bead (Figure 4).

Figure 4

For a vertical hole, decide where you'd like your bead to go and string a seed bead, the larger bead, and a seed bead. Pass back through the larger bead and the seed bead, then peyote stitch to the end of the row. *AYork a thin strip of peyote until it is tall enough to reach the seed bead at the top of the larger bead. String enough beads to reach the top of the larger bead. Pass back through the larger bead and to the other side of the peyote row. Repeat from * for the other side of the row. Continue working peyote as usual all across the row (Figure 5).

Step 3: Work the peyote side of the necklace until you reach half the desired length. Be conscious that the end of this peyote section will hang in the middle of the back of

your neck, so make adjustments to width accordingly. Also keep in mind that the end of this section must cleanly attach to the clasp.

Step 4s Attach the beadwork to the clasp by using size 15°s to work two straps of 2-bead-wide peyote that match up with the loops on the clasp. When they are long enough to reach through and wrap around the loops, weave the straps through the loops and sew back into the beadwork. Pass the thread through the beads on the body of the necklace, tie a knot between the beads, pass through several more beads to hide the knot, and trim close to work.

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