How To Finish Ends Of Fiber Necklaces

Figure 23. The Four-Strand Braid: A four-strand braid results in a round braid while a three-strand braid is flat. Loop two lengths of braiding thread through one or two warp threads at the top of your necklace. Then, with the four strands spread out before you as shown, number the strands 1, 2,3, and 4. Pass #1 under #2 and #3 and back over #3. Then pass #4 under the #1 and #3 and back over #1. Keep your tension Firm as vou braid.

111. Warp extensions with beads.

112. Completed sample necklace with beaded and woven warp extensions.

tie the ends of the warps in a loose knot and secure to the board with a pin.) Finish the ends by wrapping. Add a loop to one end and a bead or button to the other end. (photos 111 and 112) see also Option 2 below in "Supports and Closures for Pieces with Curved Necklines."

5. Weave a slit about 3/4" long on each side of your necklace, near the top. Pass several threads through the first slit, continue on the back of the necklace, then bring them to the front again through the other slit. Wrap the ends to the threads to secure them. On one end, make a loop and on the other end make a knot or add a button to fit in the loop like a button and buttonhole. (Photo 113.)

Supports and Closures for Pieces with Curved Necklines

1. Necklaces with curved necklines usually have tabs that extend upwards from the body of the necklace. (See Pattern Nos. 12,13, and 14.) These tabs may be woven with a vertical slit near the top or with a loop across the top of the tab. Attach grosgrain ribbon, braided or loose weft thread, chain or strands of beads to the slit or tab.

How Weave Fiber Jewelry Curve

113. Several strands of loose weaving thread can be used to create a support. Weave slits into the body of the necklace and finish the ends bv wrapping.

2. The tabs may also be extended by adding warp and continuing to weave. These extended tabs may be closed with snaps, hook and eye, Velcro, button and button hole, a ribbon tie or other jewelry fasteners.

To add warp, either as an extension of the tab or on the side of a pendant, use a crochet hook or needle to slip a strand of warp thread (about 24 inches or desired length) through the top of a pair of warp threads on the existing weaving. Bring the ends of the strand together to create a 12-inch pair of warps. Add as many warp threads in this manner as desired. Pin the new warps to the board where they join the old warps. Add beads as desired to cover the transition between warps by slipping the beads onto the warp pairs. By repeating the groupings ofbeads similar to those in the body of the piece, the extensions will create a continuous design. The amount ofbeads can vary from a single bead to the complete covering of warp threads with beads.

To add needleweaving to the extensions, pull the pairs of warps together into a loose, temporary, overhand knot. Pin this knot to the board to create tension for weaving. With a temporary knot, beads can be added after weaving, then more weaving can be added until the desired length is achieved.

At the end of the extension, form a loop, either horizontally or vertically, with the remaining warps and wrap them tightly, completely covering them. One option is to add a button or bead at one side and loop at the other. A second option is to make loops on both sides and weave a short piece with a button on both ends to attach to

113. Several strands of loose weaving thread can be used to create a support. Weave slits into the body of the necklace and finish the ends bv wrapping.

114. A necklace with a separate woven support with buttons. Slits are woven into the tabs to serve as buttonholes.

Types Button Closures

115. Making a w rapped support: This type of closure can be made in any length, with either buttons or loops at the ends. Sew the ends of a cord of desired length together to make a loop; pin the loop to a board so that it is stretched out as shown in the photo. Weave over and under the loop cords with weft thread until those cords are completely covered. Vou are wrapping the cord in a figure-eight fashion.

116. Various adjustable closures with buttons and hooks.

115. Making a w rapped support: This type of closure can be made in any length, with either buttons or loops at the ends. Sew the ends of a cord of desired length together to make a loop; pin the loop to a board so that it is stretched out as shown in the photo. Weave over and under the loop cords with weft thread until those cords are completely covered. Vou are wrapping the cord in a figure-eight fashion.

116. Various adjustable closures with buttons and hooks.

the loops, somewhat like a long cufflink.

3. Weave a completely separate support using the same method as weaving the necklace. Attach it with buttons to slits woven in the tabs at the top of the necklace. (Photo 114.)

4. Wrap a double length of 1/8" to 1/4" diameter cord (sold in fabric stores to make piping) with weaving thread. Pin a loop of cord to a board of the desired length, then weave back and forth just like weaving around two warp threads (over and under and back over and under), covering the cord with thread. Attach buttons on the ends. (Photos 115 and 116.)

114. A necklace with a separate woven support with buttons. Slits are woven into the tabs to serve as buttonholes.

I he most common query asked by people watching the process is, How long does it take to make a necklace? " My response varies from, 'As long as necessary, " to "A very long time - but the result is worth waiting for, "to 4 7 lose all track of time while creating •- pp it.

- Helen Banes

There are still new horizons to explore in needlewoven jewelry. Don't limit yourself to what's shown here. Perhaps you can create your own completely new technique! (Photos 117 to 120.)

Helen Banes

118. Susan's finished necklace.

117. Don't be afraid to explore new techniques as Susan Ramseier Paep-cke did. Here, two pieces are woven separately and combined into one piece, stitched together across the top.

118. Susan's finished necklace.

Helen Banes Technique
119. In this piece, Susan used a double set of warps. One set served as the woven background and the second set carried the beads. Above and below the beads both sets of warps were treated as one and woven together.
Helen Banes
120. Susan's finished piece
Kumi Fiber And Bead Jewelry Magazine
121. Regina by Eugenia Nowlin.

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  • ville-veik lahtinen
    How to finish ends of fiber necklaces?
    4 years ago
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    HOW TO FINISH A CORD NECKLACE WRAPPING THE ENDS?
    2 years ago
  • lioba
    How to make fiber necklaces?
    1 year ago
  • Birgit
    How to finish ends of beading thread?
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