Uj Co

Tassel molds rolled with gimp and beads, or strings of beads. One string has gold leaf applied over the rolled beads.

Traditionally, gimp was most often used for rolled heads, as they are called, but you can use a finely twisted cord or a metallic embroidery thread instead. I think this method makes a lovely-looking head, but you cannot always find the right color of gimp Making your own fine cord solves that problem, and you will need about 4 to 6 yards of either to cover a medium-sized mold (about 2 >< to 3 inches deep) However, it always better to have more than you need because it is impossible to join gimp or cord in the middle of a mold.

Simple wooden shapes, or stout card or plastic cylinders, are the easiest to cover, but more complex shapes can be done without difficulty when you are more practiced

Method

Using the tip of a wooden skewer. put a little glue just inside the top of the hole of a wooden tassel mold. Press the first inch or so of cord against it and leave it to dry with the rest of the cord hanging down on the outside.

Put more glue around the rim of the hole and carefully arrange cord on it, making a nice circle Let dry. Apply more glue just underneath the glued cord, using the wooden skewer, and carefully wind the cord over the glue next to the previous row Keep winding until you reach bare wood without any glue on it.

If the shape is simple, or you are covering an outer curve (when the shape is gradually getting larger), you can do three or four rounds at a time. If it is more complex, or you are covering an inner curve (and the shape is getting smaller), you might be able to glue only half a round at a time Press the cord up against the previous round so that there are no gaps

When the shape is covered, put some glue on the neck of the mold and wind the end of the thread around it so that it is completely secure Add more glue to make sure the thread will not come undone. This thread will be covered by the skirt. Leave the whole thing to dry overnight.

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