Adjustable Knot

An adjustable knot allows you to change the length of a piece of jewelry. It consists of two figure-eight knots made from the ends of a single piece of cord. Each knot is tied around the strand of the opposite end of the cord. Here's how you make one:

1. Lay both ends of ends of the cord parallel to each other, but pointing in opposite directions.

2. Holding one end stationary, tie the other strand around the first strand like a figure-eight, as shown in Figure A-1a and b.

Figure A-1:

Tying an adjustable knot.

Figure A-1:

Tying an adjustable knot.

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3. Slip the tail of the figure-eight strand up between the stationary strand and the figure-eight strand, as shown in Figure A-1c.

4. Pull the knot tight, as shown in Figure A-1d. Use scissors to trim any excess cord from the open end of the knot.

Don't cut the long end of the cord; you need it to make your next knot.

5. Repeat Steps 2 through 4 with the other strand to make the second knot.

6. Pull the knots apart to make the necklace shorter, or slide them together to make the piece longer.

Overhand Knot

The most simple of all knots, the overhand knot is used in many beading techniques. You probably know how to make one already, but may knot, er, I mean, not call it that. To make an overhand knot, follow these steps:

1. Make a simple loop at the end of your thread, as shown in Figure A-2a.

Figure A-2:

Tying an overhand knot.

2. Bring one end of your thread under and then up through the loop, as shown in Figure A-2b.

3. Pull the thread to tighten the knot.

In many jewelry-making techniques, you can insert a needle in the loop before you tighten it in Step 3. The needle lets you slide the knot to position it perfectly.

Double Overhand Knot

Similar to the overhand knot, the double overhand knot provides a bulkier knot. It's great for holding larger-holed beads and components right where you want them. To make a double overhand knot, follow these steps:

1. Make a simple loop at the end of your thread, as shown in Figure A-2a in the overhand knot directions.

2. Bring one end of your thread under and then up through the loop, as shown in Figure A-2b in the overhand knot directions.

3. Bring the end of the thread under and through the loop once more, as shown in Figure A-3.

4. Pull the thread to tighten the knot.

Figure A-3:

Creating a double over hand knot.

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