Twisted torque bangle

You will need Six cotors ot 20-gauge wire 4 x 5mm round siiver beads Masking tape

Round- and flat-nose pliers

Wire cutters

Vise and hand drm

Cylindrical dowels or mandrels. 'A in. and 2 in in diameter

The most beautiful torque bracelets and neck rings have been recovered from Celtic burial sites. The torque was a badge of rank and power, and classical writers have reported that Queen Boadicea wore a golden neck ring and bangles when she went into battle against the Romans. This technique can be used to make a variety of choker collars, as well as bangles, and beads can be introduced to plug the ends of the wire.

BELOW

The bracelet ami choker neck-ring torque look fun and \azzy made in these bright colored wires. For a more classic, elegant look. list' a combination of gold and silver wires.

Twisted Wire Neck Collar

I . Cut six 14-in. lengths of 20-gouge colored wire, one in eoch color, tope the ends with masking tope, and twist together (see page I 7). Remove the wires from the drill and vise. Wrop the twisted wires loosely around a cylindrical dowel mandrel 2 in. in diameter, ond form into a circle.

£. Remove the mosking tape from the ends of the twisted wires. Place the small dowel or mandrel about 2 in. from one end and curl the twisted wires around it to form a loop. Repeat at the other end of the bangle, coiling this loop in the opposite direction to the first one.

• l\ Form the remaining wire in front of the loop inlo a tight spiral (see page 15), ond press it flat against the wires thot you wrapped around the bangle in the previous step to hide them.

. Unravel the ends of the twisted wires on both sides up to the point at which the loop begins. Push three wires behind the loop on each side, and three in front of it. Wrop two of the wires in front of the loop around the bangle several times, cut off any excess, and neoten the ends (see page 1 7).

• l\ Form the remaining wire in front of the loop inlo a tight spiral (see page 15), ond press it flat against the wires thot you wrapped around the bangle in the previous step to hide them.

0. Form one of the remaining wires on each side into a spiral (see page 15). Thread one silver bead onto the two remaining wires on each side, and spiral the ends (see page 15).

(). Adjust the positions of the spirals and beads with your fingers, so thot they can be seen through the loops.

Wire Jig Pattern Book

chapter 3

spiral chains

The spiral is probably the most characteristic and distinctive symbol of the Celtic style. In this chapter, you will learn how to create spiral units to form beautiful, hand-made chains that reflect the timeless, swirling patterns of the ancient craftsmen. Experiment with using other gauges and types of wire than those suggested here; you will be surprised at how different the results can look!

The spiral is perhaps the most identifiable sliape of Celtic culture and this chain is the epitome of Celtic style. The Irish Celts used the spiral as a symbol of their sun. A loosely wound spiral, as in this design, meant a big sun and was the symbol for "summer." while a tightly wound spiral, as in the Double Spiral Necklace on page 62. stood for "winter." Make this chain in a classic gold-and-silver combination or, for a summery, contemporary look, use a blend of colored wires.

open spiral bracelet

ABOVE

The open spirals of gold and silver wire are interspersed with colored beads to prikhtce a necklace that can he linked at vaiying heights between the spirals.

You will need 20-gauge gold and silver wire Round- and Hal-nose pte'S Wire cutlers

Hammer and steel stake

1 . Cut four 4-in. lengths of 20-gouge gold wire ond three of silver. Using the tips of your round-nose pliers, curl o smoll loop ot one end of eoch piece of wire. Holding this loop tightly in your flat-nose pliers, form the wire into an open spiral (see page 15).

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2,. When you have about 2 in. of wire left, place your round-nose pliers on the wire and curl it around in the opposite direction to the spirol to form a small loop.

). Hold the small loop in your flat-nose pliers and pull the extending wire around the outside of the open spiral.

). Hold the small loop in your flat-nose pliers and pull the extending wire around the outside of the open spiral.

4*. Using the tips of your round-nose pliers, curl the end of the extending wire back on itself to form a second loop on the opposite side.

0. Hammer each spiral to flatten and work-harden it (see page 21).

(). Make seven silver jump rings (see page 16), and link the spirals together, alternating gold and silver units. To complete the bracelet, make a spiral clasp (see poge 18).

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Responses

  • aatifa
    What guage wire to use to make a celtic torque?
    5 years ago
  • selamawit tesfay
    How to make a torque bangle?
    5 years ago
  • Lavinia Maggot
    How to make a celtic torque necklace with wire?
    3 years ago

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