Wire

Wire is available in many thicknesses, types, and colors. Colored, copper, ond plated wires con be bought from most croft ond hobby stores, os well as from bead suppliers. With the exception of precious metal, wire is generally sold in spools of o pre-measured length. Precious-metal wire is bought by length, the price being calculated by weight. Colored wires ore usually copper based, with enamel coatings, which means that they cannot be hommered or over-manipulated as this might 11 it...

Pins

The Celts commonly used pins to fasten their cloaks and shawls. Such brooches were usually made of bronze, with one piece of metal at the head, hammered and drawn into a long wire to form a spring and pin. These pins were often decorated with semiprecious stones, beads, and coral. In this chapter, I have provided an eclectic mix of projects, taking my inspiration from artefacts found in burial sites as well as details from illuminated manuscripts. I am sure you will enjoy creating the rings and...

C scroll pendant

Inward Facing Letter

I found this motif on a fragment of an Irish golden brooch dating back to the eighth or ninth century. The brooch was fabricated from beaten sheet gold, soldered with the 3-C scroll wire pattern. You can enlarge or reduce the design depending on the amount of wire and size of beads that you use. Alternatively, make it with twisted wires to create more filigree effect. You will need 20-gauge silver wire 28-gauge silver wire 4x8 mm crackle-effect Deads 1 x 6 mm black bead 1 x 0.5 mm crimp bead...

Fishhook clasp

The most commonly used clasp is the fish-hook, which is also one of the simplest to create. I . Working from the spool, curl the end of the wire info a small loop using the tips of your round-nose pliers. Reposition your pliers on the other side of the wire, just under the loop, and curl the wire in the opposite direction around the wider part of the pliers to form the fish-hook closp. This hook-shaped clasp is both Accorativt a nd functional. . Cut the wire off the spool, leaving about in. to...

Jewelry

Celtic Beading Patterns

This book is dedicated to my loving partner, Chris, who allows me the freedom to express myself through fiddling with wire and beads. Also, to my most wonderful sons, Ben and Charlie, who uncomplainingly put up with the chaos of a photo shoot in ihe house and finally, to my parents, Hans and Marian, who are always there for me. First published in 200 by Geo Books on imprint of Ry'and, Peters & Smell 5i 9 Broadway 5th Floor New York NY 10012 Text & project designs copyright Linda Jones...

Left

Luhr Jensen Side Planer

Hack eotton cord gives a more informal look. Matching earrings complete the sets, with the suspended beads encased in wire as in rlic Charm Cascade ( lip on page I OS. (). Twist three 5-in. lengths of 20-gauge silver wire together using o vise and hand drill (see page I 7). Wrap the twisted wire twice around o dowel Vt in. in diameter. length of 28-guage silver wire. Place the two larger circles of the units on top of one another, and wrap the wire around to...

Neatening ends

When you've wrapped one piece of wire around onother as when making o closp, for example it's important to neaten the ends to prevent any shorp pieces from sticking out and snagging on clothing or scratching the wearer. Snip the v ire os close os possible to the stem with your wire cutters, ond press it firmly with your flot-nose pliers to flatten it agoinst the piece of jewelry. Bind the ends of the wires with masking tape. Place one end in the chuck of the hand drill ond the other end in the...

Pictish cufflinks

The Picts were a confederation of tribes that came together to oppose the Roman occupation of Britain and then occupied the central and eastern parts of Scotland for several hundred years after the Romans' departure. They left a legacy of intricate stone carvings, which date back to around 650-850 ce. These large, cross-shaped slabs have stories depicted in panels, embellished with spirals and interlaced knotwork patterns. This cufflink design was taken from a fragment of one such carving. 2...

Sshaped clasp

An S-shaped clasp is another popular decorative clasp with a Celtic feel. . Place the widest part of your pliers just under the loop, and curve the wire in the opposite direction to create a mirror imcge to the first curve and complete the S shape. An S-shaped clasp is another popular decorative clasp with a Celtic feel. . Cut the wire off the spool, turn the piece over and make a smoll loop at the other end of the wire. . Place the widest part of your pliers just under the loop, and curve the...

The eye of the fastenerTiu completed eye which cm be hnW

To the ciuk of a necklace or brace let This eye can be used to complete all the clasps ril uTdirectfyor -id jump rings, used in this book fish-hook, S-shaped, and spiral. 1 . Working from the spool, curl a piece of wire around the widest part of your round-nose pliers obout 1 in. from the end of the wire to form a loop, crossing the end of the wire over itself. 4. Gently hammer the eye on a steel stake to flatten and toughen it. Do not hammer the wires that hove been wrapped over the stem or...

Swirling chain

Beaded Celtic Jewelry

This decorative pattern was inspired by the border designs found on Celtic chalices, scabbard plates, and illuminated manuscripts. The chain an apparently seamless circle of swirling spirals has a classic, timeless quality. It is fastened by simply opening one of the loops in the last chain unit slightly and hooking it over the first chain, as I felt that a conventional hook-and-eye fastener would break the circle and disrupt the unity of the piece. You will need 20-gauge silver me Round and...

Wrapped stone pendant

Stone Pendant Wire Celtic

It is probable that the Celtic tribes would have kept stones as talismans and charms, and this project shows how you could wrap a pebble, semiprecious polished stone or. in fact, anything that does not have a drilled hole to be tlireaded. The next time you are on vacation, or having a weekend break, look for an interesting stone, piece of bark, or fragment of china or glass and take it home to be wrapped in wire and turned into a pendant as a souvenir of your trip. Slows of all shapes and sizes...

Necklaces chokers

As a symbol of continuity, interlacing knotwork patterns in Celtic borders and panels are an imitation of braiding and weaving, and were used as decoration for stone, wood, and metal. Pictish artist-craftsmen, in particular, concentrated on geometrical constructions, interlacing not only linear patterns, but also limbs and bodies of humans, animals, birds, and reptiles. The projects in this chapter show how you can braid and twist wires together, as well as create interwoven structures using a...

Indisfarne choker

When the Celts converted to Christianity and founded their monasteries, they copied Gospel text from manuscripts originally brought from Eastern Christendom, particularly Byzantine and North African Coptic churches. These highly decorative eastern influences were combined with the native flowing Celtic style, producing wonderful decorative patterns such as those found in the knotwork borders of the world-famous Lindisfarne Gospels, which inspired the pattern in this choker. 1 . Cut nine 7-in....

Beadset ring

Small Spiral Curls And Coils

You wrfl need 20-gauge s fve* wire 4 mm round bead o( your choice Cylindrical dowel or rmg mandrel Round- and flat-nose pliers Wire cutters Superglue I took my inspiration for this ring from the decoration on Celtic shields. Shell, amber, and coral were often used in Celtic shields and sword scabbards, as well as red glass or enamel. which was made out of cuprous oxide crystals. The crystals were used in small lumps which, when softened by heat, were then shaped into small pellets or beads and...

Coiled fishhook clasp and fastener

Braided Necklace Fasteners

2 Wrap the extending wire around the stem, just under the loop. '3. Cut the wire off the spool, leaving about X in. extending. Using the tips of your round-nose pliers, form the extending wire into o link (see page 13). This is a variation on the basic fish-hook clasp. It is used on cord, ribbon and twisted or braided wires- in fact, anything to which a jump ring or hook cannot be attached. 1 . Working from the spool, moke two coils of wire about * in. long, in the same way as when making jump...

Butterfly necklace

Hammered Wire Jewelry Magazine

You will need 24-gauge biack iron wire Approx. 100 size 8 green and biack seed beads Round- and fiat-nose pliers Wire cutters Hammer and steel block Vise OPPOSITE Mrtfct* this black-wire butterfly in your favorite colors to suilyour personal style. The braided cor J gives a Celtic look. Much of Celtic art depicts animals as the subject. Even though butterflies were not as popular as dogs, horses, and roosters. I have given this piece a Celtic theme, through the beaded spirals on each wing. You...

Book of kells choker

Celtic Wire Jig Patterns

I took my inspiration for this choker from the Book of Kells, an illuminated manuscript now housed in the library of Trinity College. Dublin, that dates back more than 1200 years and is regarded as one of the greatest surviving treasures of Celtic art. The stone in this choker represents the stones from which the monks would have ground their colors. The pink wire unit represents the swirling framework and lavish ornamentation of the illuminated text. I . Cut two 7-in. lengths of 20-gouge pink...

Rli H HHgKJ Lsn trtJ

Lsn Magazine

To moke the centrol cross motif, cut o 6-in. length of 18-gouge silver wire. Find the center of the wire with your round-nose pliers and bring the two ends together, crossing the ends over one another about 1 in. up the wire. O. Hammer the bose of the doubled end of the wire on a steel stoke to flatten it. (). Twist one piece of wire around the other, just above the hammered area, to form a small loop, which will be the top of the cross motif. 10 . Working from the spool of 18-gauge silver...

Duo spiral bracelet

Celtic Norse Step Step Wire Jewelry

You will need 20-gauge pink wire 20-gauge green wire Round- and flat-nose pliers Wire cutters Earty man observed the beauty of nature's spirals, using them as a symbol of eternity, symbolizing life, death, and rebirth. Spirals can be found in the art of most earty civilizations, but it was the Celts who found a way of weaving two. three, four, or even more coils together. These fun, colorful bracelets, made from two tones of wire, can also be made in gold and silver for a more reserved, classic...

Triskele choker

Keltenschmuck

Suspend the triskele motif from a twisted-wire choker ring made from the same two colors ofuire. as here, or from a ready-made chain or ribbon. The triskele. or triskelion. is a motif consisting of three interlocking spirals. Three-piece spirals were used by the early monks, probably to represent the Trinity of the Father. Son. and Holy Spirit. The number three was also very important to the Celts, as it stood for the on-going cycle of birth, life, and death so this choker has strong symbolic...

Celtic cross

Celtic Triskel Chain Jewelry

Many of the finest examples of Celtic metalwork were created for the church, and embellished with precious and semiprecious gems. This jig pattern is a simplified, modern-day interpretation of a traditional Celtic-style cross. Celtic crosses differ from the later Christian crosses, which have a longer central stem. It is supposed that Celtic crosses were designed symmetrically to fit into a circle the symbol of the cycle of life . My design is suspended from a hand-made chain of S-shaped units...

Double spiral necklace

This double spiral is less delicate than the Open Spiral Bracelet on page 60. Each unit is made from one p ece of doubled-over wire, providing a very solid, metallic effect. For an elegant matching set. make earrings from just one double spiral, suspended with a pendant bead. 1 . Cut six 6-in. lengths of 20-gauge silver wire ond twelve of copper. Bend eoch length in half by placing the tips of your round-nose pliers in the center and pulling and straightening the wire on each side so that it...

Hammer and steel stake Superglue

How Make Celtic Head Dress

Cut two 2-in. lengths of 20-gouge copper wire. Using your round-nose pliers, curl each one into small open spiral, slightly smaller in diameter thon your chosen buttons see page 15 . Gently stroke hammer each spiral on a steel stoke to flatten and work-harden it see page 21 . Glue one spiral onto the top of each button. Continue curling the circles in toward each other, until they meet in the confer. Gently stroke hammer each unit on a steel stoke to flatten and work-harden it see page 21 ....

Shawl stick pin

Scottish Beading Patterns

The decorative design of this shawl or hat pin is derived from the Canna Cross a carved stone cross on the Scottish Hebridean island of Canna. dating from between 700 and 800 ce. Although very little of it now remains, the center of the cross is in the form of a circle, representing the cycle of life. Here. I've shaped the cross using a jig. in order to be sure of making it symmetrical. The same motif also makes an attractive necklace pendant or earrings. 1 . Referring to the pattern on page...

Round and flatnose piers Wire cutters

Wire Jewelry Jig Patterns

. Using the tips of your round-nose pliers, curl the very ends of the doubled-up wires into o circle, trying to keep the wires parallel to each other. Continue forming an open spiral on each side, curling them in toward each other so that they meet in the center. Leave just over ' - in. of wire uncurled ot each end, to form the links. 1 . Cut eight 9-in. lengths of 20-gauge silver wire. Using the tips of your round-nose pliers, bend the wire about 2 in. from the end. Thread two block seed beads...

Using a jig

Wire Jig Patterns

As there ere a number of different styles and types of jig on the market, you may find that you have to adjust the patterns in this book slightly. I suggest that, before you attempt any of the ig projects, you place your pegs as directed and then wrap o piece of cord or string approximately the same gauge os the wire thot will be used around the pegs, following the pattern. Measure the amount of cord or string that you have used so thot you know how much wire you will need to make the project,...

Twisted torque bangle

Wire Jig Pattern Book

You will need Six cotors ot 20-gauge wire 4 x 5mm round siiver beads Masking tape Cylindrical dowels or mandrels. 'A in. and 2 in in diameter The most beautiful torque bracelets and neck rings have been recovered from Celtic burial sites. The torque was a badge of rank and power, and classical writers have reported that Queen Boadicea wore a golden neck ring and bangles when she went into battle against the Romans. This technique can be used to make a variety of choker collars, as well as...

Pebble and shell charm bracelet

Tutoria Pebbled Bracelet

Although no charm bracelets dating back to the Celtic era survive. I am sure that shells and natural objects would have been made into necklaces and bracelets, as the Celts were very fond of decorating and adorning themselves for ceremonial rituals. This bracelet demonstrates how you can attach un-drilled. semiprecious stones or small pebbles to a chain to create a highly individual bracelet. The gold wire enhances the warm tones of the semiprecious stone pebbles and shells, l or a...

Valentine knot bracelet

Celtic Jewelry Information

No book of jewelry projects would be complete without a heart, the symbol of love, among the designs. In this bracelet. I've given the heart a very Celtic rendering with curling spirals, and have used bone- and wood-effect beads and cotton cord to reflect the materials that would have been available in those ancient times. 8 x 8 mm wood- and booe-ettect beads Round-and lla nose pliers Wire cutters Hammer and steel stake Superglue optional The interlaced natural cot ton cord and bone and wood...

Looped knotwork bracelet

Celtic Warrior Nose

You will need 8 x 6 mm round Wue beads 8 x size 8 while seed beads 20-gauge silver wire Round- and flat-nose olceis V. -in. round dowel or mandrel Hammer and steel stake Wire cutters Celtic warriors dyed their bodies with a substance called woad a blue wood dye , drawing swirling patterns, much like tattoos, all over their skin to make them look fierce in battle. This bracelet was inspired by both the blue dye and those swirling patterns. This is 1 simple.yet effective chain-unit design that...

Twisting wires together

Twisting wires together is not only fun and quick, but can provide a bolder, more metallic feel to your pieces. Celtic craftsmen would have cast a lot of their pieces in bronze, so to achieve a chunkier, more authentically Celtic-looking effect as in the Twisted Torque Bongle on page 56 , twist six to eight wires together. I recommend using a vise ond hond drill for this technique, as it is both quick and effective. If you do not have these tools, however, attach one end of your wires to a door...

Hand drill and vise

These ore not essential tools, but they are useful for twisting several lengths of wire together see page 1 7 . A small vise that you can attach to the edge of your work table is also a helpful tool to hove if you ore braiding wire see page 1 7 , as it holds one end of the wires firmly together while you work although you could ask a friend to help. Aium A hand drill and vise useful for twisting and braiding wires. Aium A hand drill and vise useful for twisting and braiding wires. L lt n A jitf...