Ptoini Chic

I This project is your introduction to forming a basic / loop—the building block of wirework. After you master the loop, you will be amazed at the variety of designs you can create with this simple technique.

1 String a head pin through one 2 Make a right-angle bend over 3 With side cutters, trim the head side of the donut. the donut. pin to %in. (10mm).

to make the necklace

4 Grasp the wire end with the roundnose pliers about % in. (7mm) from the tip of the pliers.

5 Roll the wire in the opposite direction of the bend in a continuous motion until it forms a full circle.

you II need

Materials

24-30 in. (61-76cm) 22gauge. half-hard wire 1V* in. (32mm) donut

Assorted faceted gemstone beads, 4-10mm Toggle clasp

5 13mm oval components 23mm oval two-hole component

6 in. (15cm) medium-link chain 12 barbell beads (see page 22) 27mm tube bead

2 earring wires

2 IVWn. (38mm), 22-gaugo head pins

Tools and supplies

Chainnose pliers Roundnose pliers Sido cutters Ruler

For another look at making basic loops, see page 15.

4 Grasp the wire end with the roundnose pliers about % in. (7mm) from the tip of the pliers.

5 Roll the wire in the opposite direction of the bend in a continuous motion until it forms a full circle.

6 Adjust the position of the pliers 7 If needed, use chainnose pliers in the loop to continue rolling, if to adjust the loop so that the necessary. beginning and the end of the loop meet.

As you practice making basic loops, you'll find the point on the roundnose pliers that works to create the size loop you like—you may prefer loops that are larger or smaller than my basic loop size.

BARBELL BEADS: A CLOSER LOOK

This bead unit is made of 12 Hill Tribes silver beads strung on wire with a basic loop at each end. The barbell-shaped beads stack neatly in an X pattern, creating a lively component.

11 Slide the bead up the wire to the loop and make a loop on the other side of the bead. Continue adding basic-loop links on both sides of the donut in this way. Follow the design on page 20 or improvise to create your own.

13 Working from the wire coil, slide a bead onto the wire, make a loop, and attach it to one end of the chain. Make a loop on the other side of the bead. Slide the ring of the clasp into the loop, and close the loop with chainnose pliers. Repeat for the other half of the clasp.

8 String a bead onto the wire coil and use chainnose pliers to bend the wire in a right angle % in. (10mm) from the end.

10 Attach this loop to the loop on the donut component: With chainnose pliers, open the loop slightly to the side, slide the other loop into it, and close it.

9 Make a basic loop at the end of the wire.

10 Attach this loop to the loop on the donut component: With chainnose pliers, open the loop slightly to the side, slide the other loop into it, and close it.

12 Cut the chain in half. On each necklace end, slide an end link of chain into a loop. Close the loop with chainnose pliers.

Once you master making uniform basic loops, try linking them to silver rings, small donuts, or chain.

to make the earrings

String a bead onto the wire coil. Make a loop. Slide an oval component into the oop and close the loop. Make a loop on the other side of the bead. Slide an ear wire into the loop and close the loop. Repeat for the other earring.

This set uses the same technique, but the colorful lampworked beads create a totally different look—fresh and playful.

necklace and earrings necklace and earrings

This project introduces the wrapped loop. Wrapped loops are more secure than basic loops, and they enable you to design with finer wire, which is important when working with beads with smaller holes.

Vou II need to make the earrings

Materials

2 in. (51mm) extender chain

Lobster daw clasp

2 earring wires

70-80 2mm silver rounds

2 6 x 8mm crystal rondelles

85-95 4mm round crystals

16 ?4-in. (19mm) curved silver tubes

Flexible beading wire

2 crimp beads

Tools and supplies

Chainnose pliers Roundnose pliers Side cutters

Flexible beading wire cutters

Crimping pliers

Ruler

When making large quantities of wrapped-loop components, it's efficient to do them assembly-style: First, string beads on all head pins; second, make all of the loops; finally, wrap the loops and tuck the wire ends.

2 Place the roundnose pliers in the bend of the wire as shown.

1 String a 2mm silver round and a 4mm crystal onto a head pin. Using the tip of the chainnose pliers to hold the head pin just above the crystal, make a right-angle bend over the pliers' jaw.

2 Place the roundnose pliers in the bend of the wire as shown.

3 Wrap the wire over the top jaw of the roundnose pliers until it touches the bottom jaw. Loosen your grip, rotate the pliers 90° counterclockwise (left-handers, rotate clockwise), and continue wrapping the loop around the bottom jaw of the roundnose pliers.

4 If the loop is not perfectly centered over the bead, bend the loop by turning the pliers slightly counter-clockwise while holding the bead. (If you are left-handed, rotate clockwise.) When the loop is centered, the wires should cross at a 90° angle.

5 Holding the loop with chainnose pliers, grasp the wire end with your fingers or a second se: of pliers.

6 Wrap the wire into the gap, starting next to the loop and moving toward the crystal. It should take 2-3 wraps to fill the gap.

7 Trim the end of the head pin close to the wraps.

5 Holding the loop with chainnose pliers, grasp the wire end with your fingers or a second se: of pliers.

6 Wrap the wire into the gap, starting next to the loop and moving toward the crystal. It should take 2-3 wraps to fill the gap.

7 Trim the end of the head pin close to the wraps.

8 Use chainnose pliers to tuck the wire end between the wraps and the bead.

8 Use chainnose pliers to tuck the wire end between the wraps and the bead.

9 Repeat steps 1-8 to make three components for each earring (six total). To finish the earrings, open the loop on an ear wire, string three components, and close the loop. Repeat for the other ear wire.

to make the necklace

1 Make 60-70 wrapped-loop components as in steps 1-8 of the earrings directions. String the components on the flexible beading wire.

2 Group the wrapped-loop components as tightly together as possible. String a 6 x 8mm rondelle crystal and a curved tube on each side of the wrapped-loop components. Alternate crystals with tubes until you reach the desired length. Use crimps to attach the clasp to one end and the extender chain to the other.

4 Finish the wrapped loops to create dangles at the end of the extender chain.

3 Follow steps 1-4 of the earrings directions to begin three additional wrapped-loop components. Before wrapping the loops, string the components onto the last link of the extender chain.

4 Finish the wrapped loops to create dangles at the end of the extender chain.

I often create a decorative dangle for the end of an extender chain. This serves a practical purpose—to add a bit of weight to the end while giving the wearer something to grasp as she closes the necklace. The dangle can also mirror a design element—in this case, the dangles on the extender match the earring dangles.

A burst of wrapped-loop dangles creates a focal point above this toggle closure.

With wrapped loops, you can build sturdy, secure bracelets and necklaces from almost any type of bead.

Focal bead by Anne Choi

With wrapped loops, you can build sturdy, secure bracelets and necklaces from almost any type of bead.

Focal bead by Anne Choi

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