The first time you try offloom weaving the beads will seem the siztel

DUST MOTES. YOUR FINGERS WILL TURN TO BRATWURST. THE THREAD WILL EM01 INTO TANGLED CATASTROPHE.

THE SECOND TIME WILL BE BETTER. THE THIRD TIME—IF THERE IS A THIRD

ENCOURAGING WORDS

Never let bead thread smell your fear. Approach II as you would a rottweiler: calmly, kindly, but with absolute assurance that you are in charge.

Directions for beadwork are more laborious than the beadwork itself. Try not to be put off by instructions that run to several paragraphs. Thread a needle, pile up some beads in your favorite colors, and start with Step 1. You'll soon be muttering. "Oh, is thai all?"

When in doubt, keep going. Often the stitch will clearly emerge only after several rows. Weave eight or 10 rows before you throw the sample across the room.

Beads have holes. Tins means that you can gel from any point on your weaving to any other point without leaving telltale tracks: you simply sneak from hole to hole. If you're prone to losing your way. large-holed beads are a blessing. They allow more passes of the thread. Think of them as interstates.

BEADS

Off-loom weaving is done with seed beads in various sizes. Most common is size 11. (See Seed Beads, page 9.)

E—YOU'LL BE HOOKED FOR LIFE.

THREAD I

Most bead weavers work with bonded nylon, mufl ament thread. It comes on large and small s|ixl in a variety of colors, and any store with boatirm supplies will carry it.

The length of the working thread Is a tradwftJB longer il is, the less often you have to mmauB die. but the more easily it tangles.

Some headers double the thread to provide carl strength and security. Others work with a ^ I thread, convinced that no amount of securtlfM worth dealing with one more strand.

Bead thread has more body and fewer Riniu(1 waxed. Before starting to weave, pull uhmivhH over a small piece of beeswax (available atmfl craft stores).

NEEDLES

You'll need the rigid needles that resemriln sm "sharps." Use the largest-eyed needle vourliH will put up with. The size of the bead is lotfl tant than the size of the hole. Japanese n«8tll beads are universally loved, not just for ttafl I nificent finishes, but for their huge holes. MI ca beads—the tiny, cylindrical beads—lookfl breakingly small, their holes are large r^cnta larger needles.

FIGURE 1

!hg the thread jimtcu begin or end a thread, you'll have a mi ae buried In the- weaving. You can ■eteis as Itvev op up or go back and bury ~pi£en )Ou've fmisiied weaving.

Ivjritit! simclv take the needle through sever-Sthe woven area, moving in a zigzag pat-*4tpnf a single knot around a woven thread twu direction. See Figure 1. Clip fMLSeel each knot with clear nail polish or apptei tn a straight pin, to ensure amount

InilMgne* thread, leave a 6-inch (15.5 ptD&ir* in the future. When you're ready, ■■ i !®=<fooito the (all and bury it.

ATTACHING FRINGE

Whether attached to a plastic ring or a peyote pouch, fringe is made the same way. (See Making Fringe, page 22.) Attaching it to woven |ewelry is a simple matter.

If it's convenient, leave a very long tail when you first begin to weave the piece. You can use it later to make fringe. (See Comanche Earrings, page 98.) Otherwise, simply bury a new thread, exiting where you want to begin the fringe.

Essentially, exit a bead on the bottom of your piece, make a strand of fringe, then take the thread back up through the adjacent bead. The next strand of fringe can hang right next to the first one. or you can needle through several beads, adding the next strand of fringe several beads away. See Figure 2.

Wwv^S

seed beads are like paintings by georges seurat. each bead is a dot of color. and the eye blends them into an image. CAROL WILC4 WELLS

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From Comanche FIGURE 2

From Peyote

THE STITCHES

Each of these stitches appears in several projects. The easiest way to learn them is to weave a sample with the stitch. Once you're comfortable with it, move on to the project itself To help visualize the stitch, many of the instructions specify light and dark beads.

BACKSTITCH

Not everyone would agree that stitching beads onto a leather backing comes under the heading of weaving. Bui bead embroidery, as it's often called, is a good place to get comfortable with a needle and small beads. Heavy fabric can substitute for leather In this sample.

1 Thread a beading needle with about t yard (.9 m) of beading thread. Double the thread and knot it.

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2 Moving from wrong side to right, bring the needle up through the leather. Pick up four beads on the needle. Pull the beads down to the end of the thread and position the line of beads where you want It.

3 Insert the needle back down through the leather right next to the fourth bead.

IITFANi GLASS WITH S(E 9 IN BACKSTITCHED A R 0 U * t^H

DESIGN GINI WILllAMiJ

4 Bring the needle back up through the lead] between the second and third beads Tate c die back through the last two beads, inovufj same direction. See Figure 3.

5 Pick up four more beads and continue -nil| same manner.

You may want to add more than four beads I time if you're covering a long, straighi row II curve is sharp, you may need to add few«^ principle remains the same.

FIGURE 3

KYOTE

Mils ramus lorms. peyote is probably the most p 8iir.li among contemporary beaders.

^■ktrecommon;! inat beginners learn the Kosng large isi:e 6) seed beads, and thou Htm urn? exactly that. On the other hand, ^megmnt;^ mm it much easier to learn on ■■(ems. and small cylinder beads at that— ■¡ft called ttelir.a or antique beads. They sim-i ft rp fflo trace hi

■Eye Tt • » CARDBOARD mow PAPER TOWELS

Cardboard tubes are useful for larger projects. They're lightweight and somewhat adjustable in diameter. You'll begin each project by stringing some beads and tying them in a circle. To use the

I NI

Tubular Peyote

This is the original peyote stitch (also called gourd stitch, Mohawk stitch, and Ute stitch). Worked over a solid, tubular core, it was used extensively to cover handles of gourd rattles for peyote ceremonies. The tube can be anything round—a pencil, a dowel, a jar, even a toilet paper tube—and can vary markedly in diameter.

The tubular peyote projects in this book use two types of cores. The slender, supple necklace on page 92 Is woven around a piece of braided, poly ester performance rope 1/4 inch (1 cm) in diame ter. The peyote pouches on pages 86. 88. 90, and 91 were woven around the cardboard tube from a roll of paper towels or toilet tissue.

alternate tows of dark and light beads, dark and ii|ht stripes will alternate down the rope. (There will te two dark rows next to each other, with beads # 1 and »17 at the tops.)

Iibular Peyote. Even count ?is advantage of even-count is that it allows lor a <« bottom on the pouch. It differs from odd-count ifcjote in one simple particular.

1 rtireaci a stiff beading needle with about 1 yard i.9 m) of thread. Don't knot it.

2 Alternating dark and light, string 30 large seed beads. Tie the beads in a circle, using an overhand to*. See Figure 7.

3 Make a cardboard core and adjust it to fit the ads isee page 65).

t om t right to left, take the needle through the tetiead to the left of the knot—bead #1. Pick up 'ifjht bead and take the needle through bead #3. Dttup another light Dead and take the needle rou£>| Dead #5. See Figure 8. Continue around wmcic until you're back to bead #1.

5 Pick up a light bead and take the needle again through bead #1. Then take the needle through the next high bead—a light bead. See Figure 9. That last maneuver was a step-up; It finished the row and brought the thread up one level, ready to start the next row. You'll need to repeat this step-up at the end of every row.

FIGURE 7

ernate rows of dark and light beads, dark and iflfit stripes will alternate down the rope. (There will tie two dark rows next to each other, with beads HI and #17 at the tops.)

Tubular Pevote, Even Count The advantage of even-count is that it allows tor a I» bottom on the pouch. It differs from odd count p*M>te in one simple particular.

1 Thread a stiff beading needle with about 1 yard i.9 m) of thread. Don't knot K.

lAtiemating dark and light, string 30 large seed toads. Tie the beads in a circle, using an overhand toot. See Figure 7.

3 Make a cardboard core and adjust it to fit the fcads I see page 65).

right to left, take the needle through the 1 to Dead to the left of the knot—bead #1. Pick up light bead and take the needle through bead #3. to jp another light bead and take the needle p'totigr Dead #5. See Figure 8. Continue around fteorcie until you're back to bead frl.

FIGURE 8
FIGURE 9

5 Pick up a light bead and take the needle again through bead #1. Then take the needle through the next high bead—a light bead. See Figure 9. That last maneuver was a step-up; it finished the row and brought the thread up one level, ready to start the next row. You'll need to repeat this step-up at the end of every row.

unci a ote pc to tur access

With i even ; ble ne barrel | cover; and tl simpli and tl methc struct excitii I great« kind I polyir |

Detail for nn specia

{conltm

bead (#13) ana take the needle through #12 (the next light bead). Continue adding dark beads until the row is complete. See Figure 13.

7 Continue to add rows until you're familiar with the stitch.

Decreasing the rows. Even Count Unless you're weaving a square or rectangle, even tually you'll need to make some rows shorter than others. With even count, it's easy.

After you exit the last bead in the row. take the nee die under the edge thread and pull it through. Loop the thread around the edge thread, then take it back through beads A and B. You're now ready to add a new bead for the new, shorter row, See Figure 14.

flat peyote stitch, odd count Odd count isn't hard, but It's a small ntlM the end of every other row. In the ab& good reason not to. make your base su nn number of beads and work in even cow

1 Thread a short, stiff beading needlt wlllj thread.

2 String on a light bead, then take the r through the bead again in the same din secure it. Leave a 4-inch (10.5 cm) tall.

3 String eight more beads, alternating i;g»J dark (see Figure 15) for a total of nine 1 base strand.

4 Pick up a light bead (#10). Skip w i| bead and take the needle through bead A Figure 16. Continue to needle through e«J bead until you come to the end o< tne ™

TOP:

EVM COUNI FLAT PEYOTE BOTTOM TWO DROP PEYOTE

i PWPH- foxi I! handy to tape the tail to the m masking tape, with the tail head-TiKL otnets don't.

ncn f|gni to left, pick up a light bead Bketfti needte uac^ through bead #7 (the fct&n. he» up anotner light bead and take the needle through ft5. Continue to pick up a light bead and take the needle back through the next dark bead until you have completed the row. See Figure 12.

6 To bead the next row, turn the work around so you can work from right to left again. Pick up a dark

and a ote | h to tur access

With i even ; ble nc barrel , cover« and fl simple and tl meth< struct excitii great e kind I polyrr r

Detail for nn spec i a

(cofi/im

figure 13

bead (#13) ana take the needle through #12 (the next light bead). Continue adding dark beads until the row is complete. See Figure 13.

7 Continue to add rows until you're familiar with the stitch.

Decreasing the Rows. Even Count Unless you're weaving a square or rectangle, even tually you'll need to make some rows shorter than others. With even count, it's easy.

After you exit the last bead in the row. take the nee die under the edge thread and pull it through. Loop the thread around the edge thread, then take it back through beads A and B. You're now ready to add a new bead for the new. shorter row. See Figure 14.

FIGURE 14

FLAT PEYOTE STITCH. ODD COUNT Odd count isn't hard, but it's a small nui the end of every other row. In the abs good reason not to. make your base straw number of beads and work in even couni

1 Thread a short, stiff beading needle wMt] thread.

2 String on a light bead, then take the through the bead again in the samedif secure it. Leave a 4-inch (10.5 cm) tall.

3 String eight more beads, alternating H dark (see Figure 15) for a total of nine, base strand.

4 Pick up a light bead (#10). Skip over bead and take the needle through beau« Figure 16. Continue to needle through every! bead until you come to the end of the km

FIGURE 14

FIGURE 15

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t^T fit -Ti^vJ

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1 4

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dL-r-jiuBfi ttifi thread exits bead #2 rather Ikilt! tfiore is no nigh bead to attach the ito. tar only choice is to attach it to other

Deads in the neighborhood—the ones in the previ ous row. This requires a few extra flicks of the thread.

A COLLECTION OF SEED BEADS

FIGURE 17

FIGURE 16

6 Take the needle clown through bead #1. from left 8 At the end of subsequent odd-number J to right. Needle through bead #2, then it3. Now p|Ck up ule |ast ^eacJ 0f row ancJ do a head back the other way: through #13. #2, #1 around the edge thread of the two rows betas (again!) Then back through #14. Good old #14 is $ee Figure 19.

now anchored and you can proceed to weave. See Figure 17.

7 At the end of the next row (and all even-numbered rows), there will be a high bead and you can do a normal turn, as for even count peyote. See Figure 18*

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